Resource List for Pets and Large Animals

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Animal and Pet Assistance

A resource list for those needing to care for pets and/or large animals

  • Chelan area: Pets are welcome with the Wenatchee Valley Humane Society at 1474 S. Wenatchee Ave.
  • Animal related issues for Chelan and Okanogan Counties should go to Wenatchee Humane which also serves as their animal control at 509 662-9577 ext 1 or No Paws Left Behind (for Okanogan) in Oroville 509 476-2911 .
  • Brewster Vet Clinic has limited availability. Call 509-689-2616
  • Ferry County: Pets are welcome at Forget Me Not Shelter, 49 W Curlew Lake Rd, Republic, WA 99166.
  • Stevens and Ferry County: SpokAnimal can help with small pet sheltering. Call 509-995-6010, 509-994-4442 or 509-993-4071.
  • Rough Start Horse Rescue (509-723-7532) – pick up and house livestock
  • Pend-Oreille Pet Lodge (208-255-7687) discount boarding
  • Forget Me Not Animal Shelter (509-775-2308) boarding for cats and dogs
  • Chewelah Vet Clinic (509-935-6424) emergency pet boarding
  • ASPCA (509-995-8034) Pet shelter
  • Sharon Stumpf (509-935-8684) Connect pet owners with resources
  • Clayton Fairgrounds (509-276-2444 no pet housing available however, room for horses
  • Lisa Lucas (509-276-9118) Dogs only – pick up available
  • Melodies Riders (509-690-0664) horse and llama pens
  • HEART (509-981-2580) emergency shelter & rescue
  • Colville Animal Hospital (509-684-2101) provides care for cats and dogs(space limited)
  • Colville Fairgrounds (509-684-2585) large and small animals – owner responsible for care
  • Spokane Polo Club (509-994-8000) can house up to 100 horses and help haul animals. Humans can camp nearby
  • John Ford (509-793-3059) transport large animals – possible shelter for a few.
  • WSU Extension (509-477-2170) housing feed, hay, surgical blankets, salt lick, feed bags, etc.

Wahington Wildfire Shelter Listing

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Latest Shelter Locations For Those Affected by Wildfires in Washington and Idaho Panhandle

A Safe Place to Stay in Times of Turmoil

Red Cross shelters are open to all regardless of citizenship status. An overnight stay is not required. Shelters are a safe place to stay—day or night—and offer access to food, water, emergency relief supplies, health services, emotional support and recovery assistance. Visitors can also access showers, information updates and power to charge cell phones and laptops.

As of Noon, Monday, Aug. 31, 2015 the following shelters were open:

  • Grace Evangelical Free Church, 851 S. Miner St., Colville, WA
  • Clayton Grange Community Event Center, 4478 Railroad Ave., Clayton, WA

Red Cross-supported shelters are located at:

  • Cornerstone Community Christian Fellowship, 328 North Riverside Drive, Omak, WA
  • Tonasket Community Cultural Center, 411 Western Ave, Tonasket, WA

You can find shelter locations by using the Red Cross mobile app, Emergency. The app is available in Android and iPhone formats. Download the app at www.redcross.org/mobileapps or from your preferred app provider.

Anyone impacted by the fires and unable to go to a Red Cross shelter for assistance can call:

  • Central WA/Chelan area: 509-670-5331 (Chelan, Douglas, Okanogan Counties)
  • Eastern WA/Spokane area: 509-496-3448 (Ferry and Stevens Counties)

For other, non-wildfire related Red Cross inquiries please call the local Red Cross office:

  • Wenatchee office: 509-663-3907
  • Spokane office: 509-326-3330

Young Supporters Have a Winning Recipe: Lemonade and Cupcakes

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by Ginger Winings

With wildfires raging across Washington state, 12-year-old Anna Marko knew she wanted to do something to help. Her thoughts turned to fundraising by starting a lemonade stand. She contacted the local supermarket, Rosauers, who gave permission for her to set up at their location with her sister Greta and brother Jonah. With donation buckets, signs, balloons—and lots of fresh lemonade–they opened for business. Immediately, clients came in. Yet the price of lemonade—and the donations that they raised–suddenly doubled when one customer arrived and announced he would match the final tally.

Suddenly, to everyone’s surprise, the amount collected and doubled reached $664.30. When Anna arrived at the Red Cross office with the money she’d raised, she asked a question: How would this help people in the wildfire disaster?

With 17 shelters opened or supported in less than two weeks, Red Cross is providing wildfire evacuees across the region meals and snacks and access to health and emotional support. Case workers are helping people find the resources. Volunteers are delivering hot meals via mobile feeding units to devastated areas. Speaking with local volunteers, Anne’s grandmother, Janice Ritzen, also learned that the organization receives no government funds and $.91 of every dollar spent goes toward humanitarian programs.

It is with the generosity of the American public and the enthusiasm of young community members like Anna and her siblings Greta, and Jonah that the Red Cross help people who are impacted by the wildfire disaster.

For the Red Cross disaster staff, young supporters have sweetened the long days and extra hours with deliveries of homemade cookies and cupcakes. Brooklyn Baird, 7 years old, proudly handed them out in the office break room as staff took a lunch break.

We consider ourselves lucky and are inspired by the many younger friend with huge hearts who have found a way to help!

Search and Serve, Red Cross Visiting Affected Neighborhoods

Red Cross teams of disaster health professionals and other support staff are visiting areas in need. By Maggie Buckenmayer

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The American Red Cross is working hard to support the areas affected by the Washington wildfires with teams of Red Cross workers touring neighborhoods and finding those in need.

While checking on residents in the Antoine Valley, one team including disaster health and disaster mental health professionals arrived at the property where Victor Gomez and his family lived.  In offering the Gomez family comfort kits, water, snacks and other items as well as health care and mental health services, our team learned about Victor’s situation.

Victor related as the wildfires moved toward his property he wanted to save his neighbor’s home as well as his own. The sheriff came to the valley trying to get the residents to evacuate. Victor stayed, his neighbors reluctantly left.  Victor battled the blaze with a tank truck and was able to save his neighbor’s home, but his own residence was destroyed.   Victor,  his wife, their son and daughter in law lost everything to the fire.

After meeting with the Red Cross team, Victor’s wife, Sandra stated, “Thank you Red Cross for helping us.  Our prayers are with you and all those affected by the fires.”

In addition to the Red Cross initial search and support visits, Red Cross case workers have been notified and will be working with Victor and his family in the coming days to provide further relief.

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Zonia Quero Ziada: From Katrina to Washington Wildfires — 10 years of selfless service, support and hugs

Zonia celebrates her 10 years as a Red Cross volunteer staffing multiple shelters in the 2015 Washington wildfire season.

By Eric Rothenberg

“What can I do?”

That was Zonia Quero Ziada’s first question when she walked in the Red Cross office 10 years ago after seeing news pictures from the New Orleans Superdome. It was September 2005, in the immediate aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. A month later, with her Red Cross training complete, Zonia was on her way to Louisiana. “I needed to do something,” she said.

Yet no amount of training could prepare her for what she found and the emotions that followed when she arrived in Baton Rouge. “Looking at the magnitude of the operation, I had tears in my eyes,” Zonia recalls. “Just to think that everyone here is a little nobody, just like me, who takes three weeks out of their lives to help others. It was an overwhelming experience.”

While the sense of contributing a small part to the greater Red Cross effort stirred her emotions, helping those directly impacted by natural disasters has been most rewarding. “It’s very moving, very humbling.” When people are facing a disaster, she adds, “They want someone to acknowledge them, to listen, to be there.”

Today, she is trained in sheltering, feeding, casework, and as an interpreter and Zonia says preparing to help in times of crisis go beyond what’s taught in a classroom. “I’ve learned the value of the hug – and sometimes that’s all the people need. That may be most important.”

After a month in Baton Rouge she spent another month in Lafayette, La., helping those affected by Katrina and Hurricane Rita.

Zonia, a vibrant mother of four and grandmother of five from Caracas, Venezuela, has been called to more than 30 deployments around the country. She has, responded to hurricanes Ike in San Antonio, Texas, and Sandy in Atlantic City, NJ, to the Outer Banks in North Carolina and now, for the third time, to the wildfires in Washington.

This year’s wildfire disaster has grown into the largest, most challenging wildfire in Washington state history and Zonia’s experience has paid off. She’s played an instrumental role in the Red Cross sheltering operations, having a hand in opening three of 12 shelters in 10 days as fires erupted across the state.

“I’ve been driving all over, very close to the fires, opening the shelters — going one way and then another,” she said, recalling just three hours of sleep in the first 48 hours on the job. In the Pateros shelter, she reconnected with evacuated residents she had met last year. “

“It’s nice to see people who come back and recognize you, hug you, and thank you for being here again,” she said. “Working with the Red Cross and helping people holds a special place in my heart and I wouldn’t want to do anything else with my free time.”

Latest Red Cross Media Advisory

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Red Cross LogoContact: Public Information Officer

Disaster Public Affairs – Washington Wildfires

Phone:202-834-7865

Email:DR717-16PA1@redcross.org

Media Advisory – Update

 Red Cross Continues Critical Role in Wildfire Emergency Response

Service Centers Open Today

Wenatchee, WA, 10 a.m. Monday, Aug. 31, 2015 –Hundreds of Red Cross disaster workers continue to address immediate emergency needs for people impacted by the wildfire disaster. Red Cross is currently operating five shelters and supporting two shelters all of which are providing meals, water, emergency relief supplies as well as health and emotional support. Anyone needing direct assistance is encouraged to go to the nearest Red Cross shelter listed below. Overnight stays are not required to get Red Cross support at a shelter.

Red Cross Wildfire Response Information

UPDATED SHELTER INFORMATION (including location)

As of 10 a.m. Monday, Aug. 31, 2015 shelters were available at the following locations:

  • Grace Evangelical Free Church, 851 S. Miner St., Colville, WA
  • Clayton Grange Community Event Center, 4478 Railroad Ave., Clayton, WA

Red Cross-supported shelters are located at:

  • Cornerstone Community Christian Fellowship, 328 North Riverside Drive, Omak, WA
  • Tonasket Community Cultural Center, 411 Western Ave, Tonasket, WA

Red Cross Service Center – Red Cross Service Centers are open from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. and located at:

    • Columbia 49ers located at 4984 Highway 25, Hunters, WA.
    • Pateros United Methodist Church, 124 N. Dawson, Pateros, WA
    • Chelan Valley Hope, 417 S. Bradley Street, Chelan, WA

Red Cross Mobile Feeding

Red Cross will be doing a variety of mobile feeding routes in Okanogon County to include the Trunk Valley, Tonasket, Okanogon Fair Grounds and the Emergency Operations Center.

Red Cross health and emotional support available in Oroville, WA

  • The Red Cross will have health services and emotional support available at the Trinity Episcopal Church, 604 Central Ave, Oroville, WA, Monday, from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Contact the church at (509) 476-2230.

Anyone impacted by the fires and unable to go to a Red Cross shelter for assistance can call:

  • Central WA/Chelan area: 509-670-5331 (Chelan, Douglas, Okanogan Counties)
  • Eastern WA/Spokane area: 509-496-3448 (Ferry and Stevens Counties)

For other, non-wildfire related Red Cross inquiries please call the local Red Cross office:

  • Wenatchee office: 509-663-3907
  • Spokane office: 509-326-3330

Red Cross Medical and Emotional Support Continues:

Teams of Red Cross nurses, disaster mental health professionals and client services caseworkers will continue to provide mobile support in rural locations across the fire affected areas. Anyone needing medical, emotional or financial support should go to the nearest Red Cross shelter, or call the Client Casework phone number below.

Local Animal and Pet Assistance:

  • Chelan area: Pets are welcome with the Wenatchee Valley Humane Society at 1474 S. Wenatchee Ave.
  • Chelan and Okanogan Counties: Animal related issues for Chelan and Okanogan should go to Wenatchee Humane which also serves as their animal control at 509 662-9577 ext 1 or No Paws Left Behind (for Okanogan) in Oroville 509 476-2911.
  • Brewster Vet Clinic has limited availability. Call (509) 689-2616
  • Ferry County: Pets are welcome at Forget Me Not Shelter, 49 W Curlew Lake Rd, Republic, WA 99166.
  • Stevens and Ferry County: SpokAnimal can help with small pet sheltering. Call (509) 995-6010, (509) 994-4442 or (509) 993-4071.
  • Rough Start Horse Rescue. (509) 723-7532 Pick up and house livestock
  • Pend-Oreille Pet Lodge: (208) 255-7687 Discount boarding
  • Forget Me Not Animal Shelter (509-775-2308) boarding for cats and dogs
  • Chewelah Vet Clinic (509-935-6424) emergency pet boarding
  • Sharon Stumpf (509-935-8684) Connect pet owners with resources
  • Clayton Fairgrounds (509-276-2444 no pet housing available however, room for horses
  • Lisa Lucas (509-276-9118) Dogs only – pick up available
  • Melodies Riders (509-690-0664) horse and llama pens
  • Colville Animal Hospital (509-684-2101) provides care for cats and dogs(space limited)
  • Colville Fairgrounds (509-684-2585) large and small animals – owner responsible for care
  • Spokane Polo Club (509-994-8000) can house up to 100 horses. Humans can camp nearby

Red Cross encourages people to be Red Cross Ready and follow three steps to preparedness:

  1. Make a 72 hour kit.
  2. Make A Plan
  3. Stay Informed about wildfire conditions and evacuation notices.

The Red Cross mobile app, Emergency, offers important information that will help before, during and after a disaster. Download the app at www.redcross.org/mobileapps or from your preferred app provider. For more preparedness information go to www.redcross.org/prepare.

About the American Red Cross: The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies about 40 percent of the nation’s blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit www.redcross.org.

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Red Cross Volunteer Spotlight: Larry Messinger

Larry Messinger HFPC portrait

By Tiffany Koenig

Sometimes unforeseen obstacles can derail an otherwise well-planned disaster relief effort. Fortunately at the Red Cross, we have many volunteers who view such challenges as opportunities to learn and build a stronger organization. One of those special individuals is Larry Messinger, a dedicated Spokane volunteer who was on the scene of a powerful windstorm that hit the Spokane area in July 2014.  


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Larry Messinger has covered a lot of ground in his years as a Red Cross volunteer. Most recently, he’s been installing smoke alarms for the Home Fire Prevention Campaign

During the storm, winds of 50 to 70 miles per hour felled large trees, damaging homes and cutting off power to residents. At the Riverside Mobile Home Park north of Spokane, 20 homes were heavily damaged and 35 families displaced. A Red Cross shelter set up in a school across the street was ready to take people in, but residents were reluctant to use it. One major reason was that they didn’t want to leave their pets behind. “We saw that same issue at another shelter we opened in our county for a wildfire. I volunteered to jump in on that,” Larry recalls.

Taking care of pets is becoming an important part of disaster relief, and today Larry’s volunteer work includes establishing partnerships for the emergency sheltering of pets and animals in Spokane and surrounding communities. “People who have had a house fire are devastated,” he says. “They’ve lost everything they own, but they’re more concerned about what they still have, like their cats and dogs.”  

The Power of Partnerships for Pets

As Larry explains, community partnership development is essential to filling needs like this one. “We can’t do everything on our own. We depend a lot on other agencies, nonprofit and for-profit both, to help us out during disasters.” In his role as a leader of this effort, Larry works to identify organizations that can fill certain gaps with assistance that the Red Cross is called upon to provide.

Long-term planning is in Larry’s blood. Before retiring to Spokane in 2007, he worked in the mining industry for 34 years in St. Louis, Wyoming, Texas, and South America as an operations project manager and consultant. Volunteering for the local Red Cross chapter was an opportunity to put his skills to good use in retirement and get to know the Spokane community. For Larry, meeting new people he wouldn’t have crossed paths with otherwise is the best part of volunteering. “I’ve met a lot of people who, because of a combination of circumstances, weren’t able to help themselves when they had a mishap like a fire. Meeting people and getting to all corners of the community has been very rewarding to me.”

In addition to his work in community partnerships, Larry serves as a Disaster Action Team (DAT) duty officer and captain, caseworker for the Services to Armed Forces Emergency Communications program, and Restoring Family Links Services (RSF) caseworker for his chapter. Through RSF, he helps reunite family members around the world that have been separated due to war or natural disasters. When he’s not volunteering, Larry enjoys woodworking and running, and recently completed a 14k race. He and his wife, Sherry, also spend time maintaining their large yard and visiting their four grandchildren in Texas and Illinois.        

A Day’s Mission: Making 100 Homes and Families Safer

The Home Fire Preparedness Campaign: Armed with free smoke alarms, the team of Red Cross volunteers mobilize to make 100 vulnerable homes safer.

The Home Fire Preparedness Campaign: Armed with free smoke alarms, the team of Red Cross volunteers mobilize to make 100 vulnerable homes safer.

By Courtney Valenzuela

It’s mid-Saturday morning in Parkland and a team of Red Cross volunteers join the Central Pierce Fire department as they make their way through two area mobile home parks. The teams are going door to door testing and installing smoke detectors, free of charge to residents.

This event is part of the Red Cross Home Fire Preparedness Campaign, a five-year commitment aimed to reduce home fire-related fatalities and injuries by 25 percent. According to the staff at Central Pierce Fire and Rescue, mobile homes experienced the second highest number of house fires fatalities in Pierce County last year.  And for many of these homes fire alarms were deactivated or absent at the time of disaster, making a high-risk community even more vulnerable. “Older mobile homes are smaller than today’s models. They have less egress, smaller windows–many of which do not open–and are made from materials that can burn rapidly, allowing a small fire to travel quickly and consume the materials stored within,” explained Matt Holm, community service coordinator and retired assistant fire chief for the department. “In many cases the occupants did not have significant time to evacuate, or were never alerted to the fire because of the lack of smoke alarms, or properly working smoke alarms.”

In fact, more than 60 percent of these fatalities occur in homes without working smoke detectors, a number which both teams seek to reduce. The mission for today is to ensure that members of the community are equipped with a working smoke alarm, and the knowledge of what to do if they hear it go off. The visit served as a good refresher course for residents of all ages. As the adults received instructions on how to test their new smoke alarms, children were given a white board and asked to draw two emergency routes out of their house.  Many families saw this as an opportunity to talk through some of the more challenging topics of fire safety.  Although a small percentage of residents had personally known anyone to experience fire loss, it did not hinder the enthusiasm.

Ty Webb, a homeowner in the neighborhood, welcomed welcome the team in as soon as they stepped foot on his front porch. “I said, ‘Definitely, oh yes,’ I believe everybody should have a couple of smoke alarms . It does save your life.”  In addition to the new alarms, residents were given advice on a range of fire hazards including  smoking inside and what to do if you think you smell smoke “Our goal has always been to reduce fire fatalities and help educate citizens on how to prevent and get out safely in the event of a fire,” explained Holm. “This program has helped to do just that.” At the end of the day more than 100 homes had been visited and presented with information on how to better prepare for a house fire. For more information on the Red Cross Home Fire Campaign please visit RedCross.org

Hoping for the Best, Preparing for the Worst: The 2015 Wildfire Season

American Red Cross  - Carleton Complex Fire DR 416-15 EWF July 2014 Photo by Jacqueline M. Koch/American Red Cross

Reaching out to fire-impacted communities: A Red Cross volunteer hands out flyers illustrating preparedness measures for wildfire season.

 by Megan Snow, executive director
Red Cross, Greater Inland Northwest

In the Northwest, fire season usually flares in earnest in July. Not so for the summer of 2015, gauging by the wildfires that have erupted across the state. By the end of June, we’ve endured a steady onslaught of raging blazes, destroying homes and forcing people to find safety. For regional Red Cross volunteers, from Central Washington to the Idaho Panhandle, the pace has been hectic. At the start of July, we had opened eight shelters in seven days.

It’s hard to think of what will come next. What I’ve witnessed over the last two weeks brings just one thing to mind: the importance of being prepared. We can’t predict what the wildfires will do, but we can take measures to reduce risk by having a plan and staying alert and informed.

The key operating word is preparedness. I’ve worked alongside volunteers who have mobilized to open shelters and put contingency plans in place as the fires razed homes, neighborhoods and business districts. At times, these volunteers make it all seem effortless. They are there, they are ready to assist people when it’s needed most—to offer food, shelter and comfort. Preparedness, I’ve learned from experience, goes a long way. To provide immediate help as a disaster unfolds requires ongoing readiness. This means putting resources in place, ensuring our volunteers are trained for unexpected scenarios, and securing the equipment and partners needed to bring a relief operation to life, wherever it may be needed.

Preparedness is at the heart of the commitment that the Red Cross and its dedicated corps of trained volunteers have made to the communities they live in, in the Northwest region and across the country. It’s one they can keep with the ongoing generosity of supporters. We have a long summer ahead, and sadly, we can expect wildfires to continue to play a volatile and destructive role. We’re hoping for the best, preparing for the worst, and working together to make it through another tough wildfire season.

2014 Washington Wildfires – One Year Update

Red Cross volunteer Pascal Chevalier

Red Cross volunteer Pascal Chevalier

The summer of 2014 brought the most destructive wildfires in Washington state history. The firestorm that swept through Central Washington consumed 363,000 acres and hundreds of homes and decimated infrastructure across the region, creating unprecedented challenges.

One year on, the summer of 2014 is one few will forget. Yet this year, the region is preparing for worse. Wildfires have already ignited in Central Washington, forcing thousands of Wenatchee residents to flee their homes.

“Experience has shown us that we cannot overstate the value of a robust network of highly trained volunteers and the resources to be on the ground right away,” said Amanda Appel, Red Cross disaster program specialist.

In response to last year’s fire disaster, the Red Cross:

  • opened 18 shelters
  • operated 12 fixed feeding sites and served nearly 45,000 meals and snacks
  • established 5 bulk distribution sites to distribute more than 6,000 items
  • provided casework assistance to 680 individuals
  • provided health and emotional support contacts to more than 2,000 people impacted residents.

Looking back and looking forward

“Our community was hard-hit last year and they will be even more vulnerable and have fewer resources to cope this year,” Appel explained. “Therefore we need to be persistent and be creative and flexible to ensure the help is meaningful.”

A corps of trained volunteers helps to strengthen communities, making them more resilient and prepared should an emergency strike. Volunteers come with diverse skills and backgrounds. Last year, the fire disaster prompted Pascal Chevalier, born and raised in the war-torn country of Lebanon, to join.

“I’ve been a direct recipient of Red Cross assistance for all my life, so this is something I’ve always wanted to do,” Chevalier said. “When I walked in, I said, ‘I’m here, put me to work.’” He was trained immediately and assigned to support shelter operations.

Last year’s firestorms hit close to home for other Red Cross volunteers, such as Kay MacCready. “I’d worked on a couple of national disasters in the past, but it’s different when it’s in your own backyard,” said MacCready of Winthrop, a small town heavily impacted by the fires and repeated evacuation orders.

The wildfire disaster came uncomfortably close to home, MacCready admits, “But I couldn’t quit. I was working alongside volunteers who were kind and giving and I really learned a lot from them.”