What is Missing Maps? An Amazing Collaboration for Responding to Crisis by Putting People on the Map!

A collaboration among non-governmental agencies will put vulnerable people on the map to improve emergency and disaster response.

A collaboration among non-governmental agencies will put vulnerable people on the map to improve emergency and disaster response.

Missing Maps is a joint effort between the American Red Cross, British Red Cross, the Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team and Doctors Without Borders. The objective of Missing Maps is simple: to map the most vulnerable places in the world so that NGOs, communities and individuals can use the maps and the data to better respond to crises. The project seeks to literally and figuratively put people, and their communities, on the map.

 

 
Missing Maps is powered by the enthusiasm and hard work of digital/remote volunteers here at home and abroad. Through open-source technology, digital volunteers can trace satellite imagery that helps disaster responders measure damage, identify priority areas, navigate around damaged roadways and more efficiently deliver aid to people in need. You don’t need experience to participate.
 
Missing Maps is celebrating it’s one year anniversary this month. To date over 3,500 volunteers have attended map-a-thons (a mapping party) in one of 11 countries, collectively making 12 million map edits and putting 7.5 million people on the map. We can easily make a difference in another corner of the world from the comfort of our own home, school or workplace.  
 
Join thousands of volunteers around the globe and leave your own mark on the map November 15 at the University Village Microsoft Store. Drop in anytime with your laptop between 12PM and 5PM to map for as long as you want. Red Cross volunteers will be on hand to get you started and show you how to map. In exchange for your participation, we’ll treat you with refreshments and swag! 
 
Watch this video to find out more about Missing Maps and check out this before and after map of Kathmandu to see how 2,000 volunteer mappers added 30% more buildings to the map in the first 48 hours after the April 2015 earthquake in Nepal. 
 
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